The challenging times we’re all experiencing means we’re getting a lot more calls than usual and our call times are longer. So we can support people in the most vulnerable situations, we ask that you only call us if your enquiry is urgent. You can still use our online and mobile services and our automated service.

We understand that this is a very confusing and worrying time, so we’ve answered some of your frequently asked questions to help make things simpler.

Cash Withdrawals

Credit Card

Loans

Travel and holiday disruption

Cancelled events

Employee rights

Support for customers in vulnerable situations

Bereavement Support

Cash Withdrawals

  • To keep your money safe, we’d advise you not to carry large sums of money. A quick way to pay for your purchases is by using your credit card.
     
    In line with the national roll-out, the contactless payments limit has been increased on your credit card to £45. The £45 limit increase may not be available in all shops, as not all systems have been updated yet, so it’s best to check with the retailer first. You can also use your credit card for online purchases.  
     
    If you lose your card or if it is stolen, you can cancel your card and request a new one, here. You can freeze your card if you’ve temporarily misplaced it, with the handy Card Freezes feature on our Cards Services app. For added control, you can also choose how and where your card can be used.

Credit Card

Loans

  • If you’ve been financially affected by the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, you can ask us for a repayment holiday. A repayment holiday is subject to approval, but if accepted you won’t need to make the usual loan payments for up to 3 months.

    To ask for a repayment holiday, please complete our loans repayment holiday form and we’ll take care of the rest for you.

    If your loan payment is due within the next 7 working days, you will still need to make this payment and any repayment holiday you are given will start the following month. If you have a joint loan, any repayment holiday will be given to both of you. If your payment is due now and you’re unable to make the payment, we won't charge you a fee.

    We can only give a repayment holiday if your loan payments are up to date or you have missed one payment due to coronavirus. If your loan is in arrears, we have other ways of helping you. Please visit our Managing Debt page to find out more.

    Repayment holidays may not be right for everyone as we’ll extend the length of your loan at the end. This is so you can make up the payments you missed. We still add interest to your loan during the break. Because you’ll be borrowing for longer and interest is still charged, the amount you repay overall will increase.

Travel and holiday disruption

Cancelled events

Employee rights

  • Coronavirus is affecting workplaces across the UK. The current Government advice is that you should only go out to work if you absolutely cannot work from home.  Your employer may close your workplace completely. You may need to take time off due to sickness or to self-isolate.

    Changes at work can be unsettling, especially if you’re not sure what you’re entitled to. We’ve put together this information to help you understand your rights as an employee and what any changes could mean for your income.

    The situation is changing quickly, so this information is based on what we know on 1 April 2020. It’s also important to say that this information is intended as a general guide. Your circumstances may be different and we would always advise you to seek formal legal advice if you are concerned.

  • If you are off sick with coronavirus or need to self-isolate in line with government guidance, you may be entitled to Statutory Sick Pay (SSP).

    • You are entitled to SSP if you meet the eligibility conditions.
    • If you are an agency worker, you are also entitled to SSP if you meet the conditions.
    • SSP is currently £94.25 per week (increasing to £95.85 from 6 April 2020) and can be paid for up to 28 weeks.
    • Normally, SSP is paid from the fourth day of absence, but it will now be paid from day one.


    Your employer may also offer additional sick pay. You can find out by checking your employment contract, employee handbook, company policies or asking your HR department.  Remember to follow your workplace’s policy on notifying your employer that you are sick or self-isolating. If you are self-isolating, you can obtain a notification from NHS 111 online which you can use as evidence for your absence.

  • This will depend on your particular circumstances; however, as a general rule:

    1.If you can work from home

    If your workplace is closed and you are able to work from home, it is likely to be reasonable for your employer to ask you to do so.  Where this is agreed, you should get your usual pay.  Your company may have homeworking policies which you will need to follow.

    If you have to work from home due to Coronavirus either because your workplace has been closed or you need to self-isolate, the Government have published guidance that employers can make tax free payments to their employees to cover any additional household costs that you have from working from home. 

    The additional household costs include payments such as additional electricity or heating and broadband charges (if you didn’t already have this and you had to have it installed in order to work). Your employer can pay up to £6 a week or £26 per month without you needing to provide any evidence. If your employer wishes to pay more than this, you’ll need to keep records to show the additional costs and supply these to your employer.

    You can find out more here

    2. If you can’t work from home

    If you can’t work because your workplace is shut (not because you are ill or self-isolating) and it is not reasonably possible for you to work from home, you should normally still be entitled to full pay. This is because you are willing and able to work. This may not be the case if there is no contractual requirement to offer you work, for example, if you are a casual worker. 

  • Employers may need to take measures to reduce payroll costs. You could be given notice that requires you to take holidays during the shutdown, or your employer may seek volunteers to take unpaid leave.

    If there is likely to be a long-term impact on business and a reduced need for staff when the workplace reopens, employers may begin consulting on making redundancies. However, your employer might try to come to an agreement with employees and their representatives on alternatives to redundancy, such as reducing working hours or pay/benefits.

    If you and your employer both agree, your employer might be able to keep you on the payroll if they’re unable to operate or have no work for you to do because of coronavirus.  This is known as being ‘on furlough’.  You could get paid 80% of your wages, up to a monthly cap of £2,500. Find out more about this Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

  • For Government advice on coronavirus and what you need to do, including information on employment and support, visit: https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus.

     ACAS offer free impartial advice to employers and employees. 

Support for customers in vulnerable situations

Bereavement Support